downwithallthat

bigleyma is thinking…

The Abomination That Is The WCA: Excuses, Excuses…

with 4 comments

The government’s whole defence of the abomination that is the WCA rests on the argument that they wish to counter a defeatist attitude among the sick and disabled. That people have ‘given up’ on finding work. Anyone who has ever worked while sick with ‘commonplace’ ailments, for example when in the early stages of flu or an acute hay fever attack, or perhaps coming back to work after a fairly bad sprain, can see what a flimsy notion this is. Sick and disabled people have far, far worse barriers to overcome than those examples. Sick and disabled people by definition are anything but defeatist, since they have to put extra effort into their daily lives to compensate for their continuing physical/mental disadvantages. The ‘defeated’ sick/disabled person would not still be here, since they would have taken measures to end their struggles.

While Mr Grayling can only whine pathetically “But they can do some work” most sick and disabled people are already doing more than the ‘able-bodied’ just to function in everyday life. This is so intuitively true that I think its why some of the uninformed general public go straight to the ‘scrounger’ stereotype as a an explanation for people being kicked off benefits. They know that sick and disabled people genuinely have greater hurdles to contend with, because we have all experienced illness and understand the limitations it brings. Its not difficult to project that knowledge into a situation where you don’t recover, you don’t feel better. Like a case of permanent flu or a sprain which doesn’t heal (I’m deliberately using understated examples here in order to tap into common experiences of how illness affects someone’s capacity to work). So they have to cognitively dismiss the notion that genuinely sick and disabled people are being denied benefits and move on to something which makes more sense to them. Its the way our brains work, we reject ideas that don’t fit into our existing understanding about the world. Thus they skip over to the much more satisfying and fair notion that claimants are not really ill in the first place.

Secondly, and this is proven by Mr Grayling’s admission that he is not interested in ‘real world’ situations when it comes to bullying people with physical/mental impairments into jobseeking, is the complete denial of how ‘impairment unfriendly’ the contemporary uk workplace is. It is this way because of the intensification of work, because employers are focused on getting ever more out of workers while simultaneously finding ways of reducing their pay or any security of tenure of a job, so they can be dismissed according to the demands of the workload.

Imagine for a minute a sick or disabled person who is already physically disadvantaged attempting to not only overcome their personal impairments in daily maintenance, but also struggling to deal with the volume/pace of work most people are faced with these days. Imagine also the impact on a person striving to overcome psychological impairments who is subjected to the impermanence of unstable serial employment in highly stressed profit-driven work. Riding the two horses of benefits and work simultaneously is a heavy burden for even the most able-bodied, involving a permanent focus on the constant readjustment of one’s ‘status’. While in employment this involves making sure tax is deducted fairly, as every new employee is subjected to ’emergency’ rate tax, the onus being on the worker to have this rectified. Back on benefits effort has to be put in to make sure that entitlements are reinstated correctly. The administering of all this can often seem like an extra job in itself.

So we have a group of people who are already having to put greater effort into basic daily self maintenance expected to draw upon even more personal resources to adapt to work conditions which challenge even the most able-bodied. Thats if they can even secure work in the most competitive job market this country has seen for decades, where university graduates compete for mcjobs, or waitering or cleaning jobs.Since barely any job can be said to be permanent these days those coming in to the job market ‘at the bottom’ are so unlikely to partake of the benefits that genuinely stable, fair employment bestows that it beggars belief that this argument is tendered by this government. But then again, they really have no convincing alternative argument than the flimsy, outdated, inaccurate notion that Work Is (inevitably) Good For You.

*I would just like to clarify that in the above I am referring to what most people would regard as the ‘mild to moderately’ sick and disabled. Those more extreme cases which are very well known to the online communities, examples of which were most recently exposed on TV’s respective Panorama and Dispatches programmes, are more accurately defined as serious state abuses which deserve the strongest repercussions for those behind this process.

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4 Responses

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  1. Another fine commentary. Have I yet brought this to your attention? http://gwenhwyfaer.posterous.com/reinstatement I confess I don’t know why the legal community isn’t jumping all over this aspect.

    Kay Fabe

    August 3, 2012 at 9:40 am

    • Wow, that’s really something, isn’t it? From time to time I see people speculating about the Human Rights angle, because intuitively it feels as if what they’re doing *must* contravene something in that area. Thanks for that link. Worth circulating as far as possible in the hope that someone with a legal bent picks it up…

      bigleyma

      August 3, 2012 at 2:07 pm

  2. Way to make the Work Programme more effective for the chronically ill and disabled: make it entirely optional, with no compulsion and no sanctions. Provide real help. I suspect we’d be queueing up for it.

    Sam Barnett-Cormack

    August 3, 2012 at 3:37 pm

  3. It is perenially interesting to note how the top managers/ elites/ bureaucrats always need and receive ‘incentives’ to do their jobs. They need bonus packages and out-of-this-world pensions to just survive in post. Meanwhile, all other workers just get a good kicking – no incentives here just abuse and threats and removal of welfare

    The elites really are just bastards

    hedleylamarr

    August 10, 2012 at 10:49 am


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